Unfair charges require Short Hop Zone extension to Laytown

Sinn Féin TD for Louth and East Meath Imelda Munster has called for an increase in the commuter rail Short Hop Zone boundaries in the Dublin region to include Laytown.

Deputy Munster said:

“The boundaries between intercity and commuter areas on the Dublin/Belfast railway network urgently need to be reviewed.”

“The population of the area served by Laytown train station has almost doubled since 2002 and the majority of those people commute in and out of Dublin to work every day on trains that are packed to the hilt at rush hours.”

“The current boundary of 35km may have been viable sixteen years ago however with the massive movement of people from Dublin to surrounding villages, Laytown, Bettystown, Mornington and Donacarney,  this now needs to be taken into account.”

“The National Transport Authority’s (NTA) constant reiteration that the boundary must end somewhere and that they have no intention of increasing it beyond the 35 kilometre mark must be challenged to reflect today’s reality and the needs of hard-pressed commuters who are being charged exorbitant cost to travel to work.”

“An adult monthly ticket from Laytown to Dublin Connolly costs €237 compared to €154 from Balbriggan, a mere 10km along the track.”

“This matter needs to be addressed. I have raised it once again with the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport and the NTA and will pursue this issue until the unfair anomaly is addressed.”

Louth house price increases cause of concern – Adams

DSC_3254_6510Today two new reports by Daft.ie and Myhome.ie confirm that house prices are soaring and that Louth is experiencing some of the highest growth. Both reports confirm a double digit growth in house prices for the county.

Sinn Féin Louth TD Gerry Adams last week expressed his concern at the CSO figures on property price increases. Speaking this morning the Louth TD warned that “the comprehensive action plan for housing due to be published in the next few weeks by the government must tackle the twin issues of increasing house prices and spiralling rents, as well as the provision of new social and affordable homes in the housing crisis is to be resolved.”

Teachta Adams said:

“According to the latest figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO), property prices across the state rose by 6.9% in the year to May. While Dublin saw the highest rise in house prices, the rest of the state, including Louth, saw house prices increase by 8.5% over the same period.

The two reports by Daft.ie and Myhome.ie confirm that house prices in Louth are soaring. Myhome reports a 6-4% increase since the beginning of the year and a 11.86% increase in house prices since last year.Daft.ie concludes that house prices have increased by 12.5% in the last year and by 5% from the start of this year.

An earlier Daft.ie quarterly report on rents also revealed significant price increases with the average rent in Louth having risen by 14.2%.

This is the second highest increase in the State, closely following Meath where the average rent is up by 14.8%.

The inability of many households in Louth to secure mortgages to buy a home or to meet the rents now being demanded by landlords is another symptom of the housing crisis in Louth and East Meath.

One of the key recommendations of the Housing and Homeless Committee report published two weeks ago was that the Housing Agency would make an annual audit of private construction costs and compare these with other jurisdictions.

The Committee strongly recommended a shift in Government policy away from using the private sector to meet social housing need. Its central recommendation calls for the provision of 50,000 real social houses over the next five years.

Increasing the stock of social housing will alleviate pressure on the private housing market while in the interim the report proposed a number of measures to help families stay in their rented homes. Specifically it demanded that rent certainty be introduced, by linking rent reviews to an index such as the Consumer Price Index in order to provide some stability for both tenants and landlords.

Tenant rights should also be strengthened and this includes providing additional protection to tenants in repossessed buy-to-lets.

Imelda Munster and I will examine closely Minister Coveney’s proposals to see whether they help households in this constituency.”

CSO Figures on House prices cause of concern for Louth – Adams

Imelda & GerrySinn Féin Louth TD Gerry Adams has expressed his concern at the CSO figures on property price increases that were published last week.

The Louth TD warned that “the comprehensive action plan for housing due to be published in the next few weeks by the government must tackle the twin issues of increasing house prices and spiralling rents, as well as the provision of new social and affordable homes in the housing crisis is to be resolved.”

Teachta Adams said:

“According to the latest figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO), property prices across the state rose by 6.9% in the year to May. While Dublin saw the highest rise in house prices, the rest of the state, including Louth, saw house prices increase by 8.5% over the same period.

The CSO figures are in line with statistics produced by the online site Daft.ie which in their Quarterly House Prices Report in April revealed that the price of a three bedroom property in Louth had increased by a massive 16.7%.

A separate Daft.ie quarterly report on rents also revealed price increases with the average rent in Louth having increased by 14.2%.

This is the second highest increase in the State, closely following Meath where the average rent is up by 14.8%.

The inability of many households in Louth to secure mortgages to buy a home or to meet the rents now being demanded by landlords is another symptom of the housing crisis in Louth and East Meath.

One of the key recommendations of the Housing and Homeless Committee report published two weeks ago was that the Housing Agency would make an annual audit of private construction costs and compare these with other jurisdictions.

The Committee strongly recommended a shift in Government policy away from using the private sector to meet social housing need. Its central recommendation calls for the provision of 50,000 real social houses over the next five years.

Increasing the stock of social housing will alleviate pressure on the private housing market while in the interim the report proposed a number of measures to help families stay in their rented homes. Specifically it demanded that rent certainty be introduced, by linking rent reviews to an index such as the Consumer Price Index in order to provide some stability for both tenants and landlords.

Tenant rights should also be strengthened and this includes providing additional protection to tenants in repossessed buy-to-lets.

Imelda Munster and I will examine closely Minister Coveney’s proposals to see whether they help households in this constituency.”