Council/Irish Water a ‘Merry Go Round’ of red tape – Flood

Sinn Féin Councillor Kenneth Flood has hit out at the Irish Water-Louth Council arrangement calling it a ‘Merry Go Round of Red Tape’.

Cllr Flood was speaking after the recent Louth County Council Budget meeting where he raised queries regarding the costs to the Council around water services.

Cllr. Flood said “I was contacted by a Marsh Road resident in October regarding the sight, taste and smell of their drinking water. The lady advised her drinking water had a chemical taste and smell, not a
bleach smell and there was black bits floating in it. Boiling the water didn’t help the quality of the water.

“I contacted Irish Water and requested a fix as soon as possible. After an investigation they resolved the issue by flushing out the main waterline for the Marsh Road and the problem was resolved in that location.
While I am glad that I was able to resolve the issue for Marsh Road residents, the fix took longer than it should have.”

Cllr Flood explained the roundabout process of making representations. “Firstly we contact Irish Water, who then contacts the Local Authority to investigate the issue. The Local Authority then report back to Irish Water, who then weighs up the costs of a fix, and then once again they contact the Local Authority who actually carries out the repair.”

Cllr Flood said he is frustrated at this process and it is delaying urgent repairs taking place. “ Not only is it frustrating but it also means there are two sets of assessors, one in the Local Authority and another in Irish Water. This arrangement is a waste of time and money and residents are the ones affected. The Fine Gael Government and their Fianna Fail partners are not moving to resolve this. The only way to ensure a speedy and more cost effective fix is to return Water Services to Local Authorities and to dissolve the quango that is Irish Water.”

“In the meantime, our heads are spinning as we have to ride this merry go round each time there is an issue.”

Adams: New Primary Care Centre not to Open until 2020

Gerry Adams at a recent Louth Hospital protest

Sinn Féin TD for Louth Gerry Adams has expressed his frustration that the long awaited Dundalk primary care centre is not expected to open until early 2020.

Following a response received to a parliamentary question Teachta Adams stated;

“There is a longstanding government promise of a primary care centre with mental health services for Dundalk.  I have been campaigning for provision of these services for some time now.

“In Dundalk community based psychiatric services are practically non-existent, and delivered from Ladywell. They cannot provide Child and Adolescent Mental Health services, or Old Age Psychiatry services in this building.

“A new primary care centre is the solution to this.

“I have asked both the Taoiseach and the Minister of State for Mental Health to visit this 60 year old damp building to see how badly facilities are needed. They have not done this. They won’t do this.

“The HSE have told me that the developer intends to submit a planning application towards the end of 2018, and they expect services to open in 2020. This means people must continue to travel, to Ardee or Drogheda to access basic mental health services.

“It is not acceptable for people to just wait until 2020. The Minister must ensure an interim solution is put in place. I will continue to raise this issue with the government until people have access to necessary services.

Adams – Questions raised over tragic Dundalk death.

DSC_3254_6510Louth TD Gerry Adams has written to the Health Minister seeking answers to a series of questions regarding the tragic death of Dualtagh Donnelly on Monday 26th October.

The Sinn Féin President said,

“I firstly want to express my sincere sympathy to Lindzie, Fionn, Caragh, Oonagh and all of Dualtagh’s family at this terrible time.  I visited Dualtagh’s wake last week and saw first hand the devastating impact his death is having on his loved ones.

“I have written to the Health Minister today seeking answers to serious questions concerning the time lapse between the 999 phonecall being logged and an ambulance arriving at the scene.  

“I am also concerned to know where the ambulance was dispatched from, why it did not arrive until 39 minutes after the initial emergency phone call and whether there were available ambulances and sufficient medical personnel in Dundalk on the night Dualtagh died?

“Dualtagh’s family and the community of North Louth deserve to know the answers to these vital questions.”